Unearthed: 1954 Jaguar XK120

Even in the 21st century, Jaguar continues to build some of the most beautiful cars on the market. And nothing has changed from their historic past, as this 1954 XK120 proves all too well.

Jaguar is synonymous with gorgeous cars. Even before the legendary XKE debuted at the 1961 Geneva Motor Show, models such as the XK120 graced the world with its striking presence and sheer beauty.Launched in 1948, it was the world’s fastest car. “120″ referred to its top speed: 120 mph. The first cars were hand-built with all-aluminum bodies, but due to increased demand, Jaguar was forced to replace them with steel-pressed bodies. The doors, hood, and trunk lid, however, remained aluminum.

It was powered by a 3.4-liter straight-6 engine that ranged in power from 160hp to 210hp, depending on the trim level.
Even in the 21st century, Jaguar continues to build some of the most beautiful cars on the market. And nothing has changed from their historic past, as this 1954 XK120 proves all too well.

This extremely well maintained 1954 XK120 has 87,000 original miles and four documented owners. And now it’s for sale once again. Mechanically, the owners have kept the car up to date, with the current owner having had the engine completely rebuilt in 2003.Since then just 2,500 miles have been added. There’s also a new clutch, brakes, tires and chrome wheels. The interior has also been meticulously cared for and has original parts such as the original steering wheel.

However, the owner has upgraded things like the new carbon fiber gauge cover and a newer Jaguar racing steering wheel.The car has also been recently appraised by a Jaguar specialist who verified that there’s zero rust and mechanical issues. Interested? $94,000 is the price for admission.

This extremely well maintained 1954 XK120 has 87,000 original miles and four documented owners. And now it’s for sale once again. Mechanically, the owners have kept the car up to date, with the current owner having had the engine completely rebuilt in 2003.Since then just 2,500 miles have been added. There’s also a new clutch, brakes, tires and chrome wheels. The interior has also been meticulously cared for and has original parts such as the original steering wheel.

Jaguar C-X75 Supercar Nears Production

The hybrid super car concept was revealed back in 2010, and early last year Jaguar announced a limited number of its C-X75 would be launched in late 2013.

Inside Line says development of Jaguar’s supreme sports car, which is being co-developed with Williams F1, is moving fast. Williams engineers taking the lead of the car’s aerodynamic development have been challenged by cooling the car, as calculations reveal it required 1.562 square meters of air intake, which is larger than the car’s frontal area.
It can, however, produce enough down force to travel upside down at 120mph.

According to Adrian Hallmark, Jaguar’s global brand director, the C-X75 is “looking more like a sculpture than a car, and more beautiful,” as a result of these aerodynamic requirements that have altered the car’s design.

Jaguar engineering is heading the development team, with Williams providing 40 of the 100 engineers who are also contributing to the car’s carbon-fiber tub, bodywork development, and hybrid driveline.
Electric motors that drive each axle allows for considerable control over torque delivery to each wheel, and also enable the C-X75 to reach 60mph in under 3 seconds, 100mph in 6 seconds, and a top speed of over 200mph.

250 examples are to be built, priced at $1.15 million each, with deliveries to being at the end of 2013.

The photo displayed is of the 2010 Jaguar C-X75 Concept.

Development of the gas-turbine hybrid version unveiled with the concept will continue according to Hallmark, but will be offered “as an experimental car” for use on the track only.

The micro-gas turbines and elaborate exhaust systems have been installed into the C-X75 body and its idle-speed exhaust temperatures are only a tad higher than a conventional car’s.The production version will rely on a Cosworth-developed range-extender 1.6-liter four-cylinder gasoline engine based on a V8 F1 engine, producing 313hp per liter, which equates to a peak output of close to 500hp.

Jaguar Heritage Racing Returns After 50-Year Hiatus


Jaguar will return to the competitive arena, racing at venues including Goodwood and the Nurburgring, as well as attending events on the historic motoring calendar including Mille Miglia, the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance and each round of the UK’s E-type challenge.
This investment and celebration of Jaguar’s heritage coincides with the automaker’s most extensive new product development cycle in its history.

Jaguar also recently introduced a subtle update to the famous Leaper logo, which has been given a shiny metallic finish and sports the Jaguar name below it.

This investment and celebration of Jaguar’s heritage coincides with the automaker’s most extensive new product development cycle in its history.

Jaguar also recently introduced a subtle update to the famous Leaper logo, which has been given a shiny metallic finish and sports the Jaguar name below it.

Jaguar Global Brand Director, Adrian Hallmark, said: “Advanced engineering is part of our heritage – 2012 sees the 60th anniversary of Jaguar’s development of the disc brake for automotive use, and ten years since the marque introduced aerospace-inspired aluminum monocoque technology to its modern range, technology today used on both the XJ and XK.”

Looking ahead to the near future, he continued in claiming that: “Forward looking design is part of our heritage – the poised intent of the C-X16 concept pushes the boundaries today just as much as the SS Jaguar 100 did in 1935.

And racing is very much part of our heritage also – which is why we have launched the Jaguar Heritage Racing program that this year will see Jaguar C- and D-types in competitive action.”

Jaguar Heritage Racing’s first event will be the 2012 Mille Miglia retrospective in May, followed by the AVD Nurburgring Oldtimer Grand Prix in August and the Goodwood Revival in September.

Jaguar XJ220 Celebrates 20th Birthday!




Jaguar
first unveiled the XJ220 in concept form at the 1988 British Motor Show and following high praise, production of the car was approved a year later.

Tom Walkinshaw Racing (TWR) was employed to help develop the car and by 1990, prototype 001 was complete having been built by hand.

After two more years of tweaks the first XJ220 was delivered to a customer in June, 1992 for the princely sum of £470,000. Production ceased in 1994 by which time 275 cars had been built.
At 213mph it was the fastest production car in the world, and due to its advanced aluminum honeycomb body, was immensely strong and, considering its size, very light weighing just 1,470kg.

Powered by a 3.5-liter twin-turbo V6, the XJ220 channeled its drive through 18-inch rear wheels via a 5-speed gearbox and developed 542hp and 475lb-ft of torque. Standstill to 60mph was timed at under 4 seconds.

The XJ220S was the road-going version of the XJ220C, built to compete in GT racing, boasting a carbon-fiber body, front splitter, wider sills and an adjustable rear spoiler.

Pictured here in yellow is the very first XJ220S, which was built using spare parts from the Le Mans cars and that created 680hp and 526lb-ft of torque thanks to an overhaul to the twin-turbo V6. Only six were ever built, with one recently being sold in auction for $230,000.

The silver car shown is chassis 004, one of the ten pre-production vehicles. It was used for tire and high speed testing at Fort Stockton, Texas in 1991 with the car hitting 213mph during the testing process.